Becoming a Git-xpert

I have been trying to get a grip on the Pennykoin CLI code base for some time. One of the problems that I’ve had is that the original developer had a lot of false starts and stops, and there’s a lot of orphan branches like this:

Taken with GitKraken

If that wasn’t bad enough, at some point they decided to push the current code to a new repo, and lost the entire starting commit history. Whether this was intentional or not, I can’t say. It’s made it very tricky for me to backtrack through the history of the code and figure out where bugs were introduced. So problem number one that I’m dealing with is how to link these two repos together so that I have a complete history to search through.

Merging two branches

So we had two repos, which we’ll call pk_old and pk_new. I originally tried methods where I tried to merge the repos together using branches, but I either wound up with the old repo as the last commit, or with the new repo and none of the old history. I spent a lot of time going over my bash history file and playing with using my local directories as remote sources, deleting and starting over. Then I was able to find out that there was indeed a common commit between these two repos, and that all I had to do was add the old remote with the –tags option to pull in everything.

mkdir pk_redux
cd pk_refresh
git init
git remote add -f pk_new https://github.com/Pennykoin/Pennykoin-old.git --tags
git merge pk_new/master
git remote add -f pk_old https://github.com/Pennykoin/Pennykoin-old.git --tags

Now, I probably could have gotten away by just cloning the pk_new repo instead of initializing an empty directory and adding the remote, but we the end result should be the same. A quick check of the tags between the two original repos and my new one showed that everything was there.

The link between the two repos

Phantom branches

One of the things that we have to do as part of our pk_redux, as we’re calling it, is setup new repos that we actually have control over. This time around, everything will be setup properly as part of governance, so that I’m not the only one with keys to the kingdom in case I go missing. I want to take advantage of GitLab’s integrated CI/CD, as we’ve talked about before, so I setup a new group and pkcli repo. I pushed the code base up, and saw all the tags, but none of the branches were there.

The issue ultimately comes down to the fact that git branches are just pointers to a specific commit in a repository’s history. Git will pull the commits down from a remote as part of a fetch job, but not the pointers to those branches unless I physically checked them out. Only after I created these tracking branches on my local repo could I then push them to the new remote origin.

Fixing Pennykoin

So now that I’ve got a handle on this repo, my next step is to hunt some bugs. I’ll probably have to do some more work to try and de-orphan some of these early commits in the repo history, cause that will be instrumental in tracking down changes to the Cryptonote parameters. These changes are likely the cause for the boostrap issue that exists. And my other priority is figuring out if we can unlock the bugged coins. From there I’d like to implement a test suite, and make sure that there is are proper branching workflows for code changes.

Frustrations

I’m a bit perturbed right now. I went back to Django project I hadn’t worked on in two weeks and could not get my Pycharm interpreter working properly. I’d updated from the Community Edition to the Professional Edition during that time, which I’m not sure had anything to do with it, but this failed session brings me to another source of frustration with things that I need to get off my chest.

There are 3, maybe 4 ways that one might need to interact with a Django app in Pycharm. The first, being the Python console itself. The second, the regular command terminal. Third would be the various run configurations that one can setup. And four would be the Django console that Pycharm Pro enables. My issue is that each of these has their own environment variables settings! Maybe it’s just my inexperience showing through here, but I tend to use several of these when I’m working. I have a run configuration for the test server running, then the Django console for migrations and tests, and a terminal window that’s actually running the Django shell, so that I can muck around with code while I’m figuring things out.

I don’t know if I’m an idiot or what, but it just seems extremely ineffective, and I have got to be missing something.

Working alone

Last weekend I finally got around to reading Two Scoops of Django, and it was very interesting. I wish I had picked it up earlier. I think I first started really delving into the Django framework about 3 months ago or so, and I’ve really enjoyed tinkering around with the models and ORM. I’ve done a bit with the forms and views, but I’ve spent a lot more time trying to draft out some data models for various projects and get a feel for how things work. I’ve fallen into my trap of getting too caught up in tools in order to actually deliver anything yet, but I’ve got two projects that I am primarily working on. I’ve been very disciplined about spending at least an hour or more each day on one of them.

Part of me thinks I should just focus on the one at the exclusion of the other, just to focus and plow through. “Starting is easy, finishing is hard,” as Jason Calacanis says. The other voice in my head is telling me that as long as I’m pushing forward on one of them or the other, it doesn’t matter, since the skills I’m learning on each will translate to the other. The last few days have seemed like my wheels are spinning though, as it seems I spent more time sharpening my ax than I did actually cutting down trees. I spent what feels like two whole days just trying to figure out how to setup cookiecutter-django the way I wanted it, another day or two trying to figure out why pipenv doesn’t work properly in Pycharm, and then another trying to figure out how to get Celery to work. Yesterday it was all about how to properly clone a 3rd party Django app so that I can make some modifications to it. And I’ve spent hours trying to figure out how to do my tests, what needs testing and what doesn’t. Endless hours on Medium reading everything I could find related to any of the above.

But as long as I can sit down and work on something, I tell myself I’m making progress and becoming an actual developer. I’ve talked about discipline previously, and that discipline is paying off with my day job as well, whether it’s Powershell scripts, or more Python API wrappers. The hardest thing about it for me is the solitary nature of what I’m doing. Not having a team or partner with these projects is the hardest, cause it ultimately means that I have no one to bounce ideas off of in real time. Best I can hope for is to dump something out on StackExchange and hope that someone gets back to me. Most of the time, just explaining the question sufficiently enough for someone else to understand it spurs the kind of subconscious creativity that leads to a solution.

There’s been many false starts already, but I’m starting to get there.

Currently, with a fintech app I’m working on, I’m trying to determine how I expand a cryptocurrency wallet app designed for Bitcoin and other assets that use it’s RPC interface. The asset that I’m working with is a fork of a privacy coin with the un-shielded send functionalities disabled. So I’ve got to figure out the simplest method to update all the calls in this library so that they’ll use the shielded commands for this asset while retaining the existing commands for the legacy assets. So far, I’ve decided to try adding a boolean field to the currency model and add an if clause to the Celery tasks to choose between the two based on the boolean. It requires modifying code in each of the various function. While it’s simple, it seems to violate one of the core principals of Django, which is don’t repeat yourself (DRY). It seems to me that there is another way that I can add a decorator or something to each of these functions — maybe a strategy pattern — to do that bit of logic in a way that would make it easier to implement. Maybe even without having to fork the 3rd party app in the first place.

We shall see.

Free JetBrains software for academic developers

So I’m pretty happy cause today I found out that JetBrains is offering free licenses to their entire software library for students and faculty members. I’ve been using PyCharm Community edition for some time now, and am really glad to have access to the Professional version with all the plugin and Django support. I actually purchased a CLion license a year ago or so. They make really good software, and I encourage everyone to check it out.ย