Gaussian Elimination with TDD C++, Part 1

I’m pretty pleased with myself. I managed to pull an epic coding session Friday night and met the deadline on a school assignment. I almost used the word finished there, but I merely got it working. As Uncle Bob said, getting it working is the first step to completion, refactoring and cleaning it up is the next.

The purpose of the assignment was to implement a Guassian Elimination function in C++. The professor, an old Fortran/C++ veteran who had done a lot of scientific matrix work back in the day, wanted us to use pointer pointers for the matrix rows, to make swapping rows faster. They gave us the following specification of how the Matrix would be represented in a data file:

3 // int N representing the size of the matrix A
1 1 1 // values of A[row i]
0 1 1 // A[i+1]
0 0 1 // A[i-N]
1 1 1 // right hand side

The professor then went through the algorithm for solving such a matrix on the board. Later they showed us how to generate datafiles with solvable problems for testing, but we’ll skip over that for now.

The example that the professor did in class was a bit of a mess, so I went looking for better examples. Rosetta Code has examples of Gaussian Elimination in many different programming languages. The C version is pretty close, but even looking at the gauss_eliminate function here, we can see that it’s doing a lot and can further be broken down into smaller functions.

void gauss_eliminate(double *a, double *b, double *x, int n)
{
#define A(y, x) (*mat_elem(a, y, x, n))
    int i, j, col, row, max_row,dia;
    double max, tmp;
Β 
    for (dia = 0; dia < n; dia++) {
        max_row = dia, max = A(dia, dia);
Β 
        for (row = dia + 1; row < n; row++)
            if ((tmp = fabs(A(row, dia))) > max)
                max_row = row, max = tmp;
Β 
        swap_row(a, b, dia, max_row, n);
Β   
        for (row = dia + 1; row < n; row++) {
            tmp = A(row, dia) / A(dia, dia);
            for (col = dia+1; col < n; col++)
                A(row, col) -= tmp * A(dia, col);
            A(row, dia) = 0;
            b[row] -= tmp * b[dia];
        }
    }
    for (row = n - 1; row >= 0; row--) {
        tmp = b[row];
        for (j = n - 1; j > row; j--)
            tmp -= x[j] * A(row, j);
        x[row] = tmp / A(row, row);
    }
#undef A
} 

My experience with C++ has been limited, mostly schoolwork with CodeBlocks and Eclipse; I prefer using JetBrains these days. And I’ve never done tests in it, so after I set up a new repo the first thing I did was spent some time figuring out Google Test before I wrote my first line of code. I started with making sure I could load files, then started writing output helpers, overloading the ostream operator and creating a print() function.

Let me say: Test Driven Development is HARD. It requires a lot of thought up front about what it is that you are trying to do. I started off with a todo list:

- call GaussianElimination function
- read file from file system
- get size from file
- create matrix(size)
- load vector data from file
- create 2d vector array size N
- initialize matrix with values 

and started working through each of them, going through the red light/ green light cycle: writing a test that would fail, then implementing the code that would make that test pass — and NOTHING MORE. Like any discipline, it’s hard. But the effect is amazing. Having a magic button that lets you change code and get [ PASSED ] back after is exhilarating.

I’ll admit that I cheated a bit as the deadline approached. I hadn’t implemented proper comparison operators for the Matrix class, so I was doing everything by eyeball before I got to the point where the code worked and I could submit for credit. The result was still a far cry from the way I usually operate, with a bunch of manually entered code.

I’ll share more in a further post.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *