QuickType and Ameritrade’s API.

My life goal of automating my job out of existence continues unabated. I’ve been spending a lot of time dealing with the APIs of the various vendors that we deal with, and I’ve spent a lot of time pouring over JSON responses. Most of these are multi-level structures, and usually leads to some clunky accessor code like object['element']['element']. I much rather prefer the more elegant dot notation of object.element.element instead, but getting from JSON to objects hasn’t been something I’ve wanted to spend much time on. Sure, there are a few options to do this using standard Python, but QuickType is by far the best solution out there.

I’ve been using the web-based version for the past few days to create an object library for Ameritrade’s API. Now first off, I’m probably going overboard and violating YAGNI (you ain’t gonna need it) principles by trying to include everthing that the API can return, but it’s been a good excuse to learn more about JSON schemas.

JSON schema with resultant Python code on right.

One of the things that I wish I’d caught earlier is that the recommended workflow in Quicktype is to start with example JSON data, and convert it to a JSON schema before going from that schema to your target language. I’d been trying to go straight from JSON to Python, and there were some problems. First off, the Ameritrade schema has a lot more types than I’ll need: there are two subclasses of securities account, and 5 different ones for the various instrument class. I only need a small subset of that, but thankfully Quicktype automatically combines these together. Secondly, Ameritrade’s response summary, both the schema and the JSON examples, aren’t grouped together in a way that can be parsed efficiently. I spent countless hours trying to combine things into a schema that is properly referenced and would compile properly.

But boy, once it did. Quicktype does a great job of generating code that can process JSON into a Python object. There are handlers for all of the various data types, and Quicktype will actually type check everything from ints to lists, dicts to unions (for handling Nones), and will process classes back out to JSON as well. Subobject parsing works very well. And even if you don’t do Python, it has a an impressive number of languages that it outputs to.

One problem stemming from my decision to use Ameritrade’s response summary JSON code instead of their schema is that the example code uses 0 instead of 0.0 where a float would be applicable. This led to Quicktype generating it’s own schema using integers instead of the JSON schema float equivalent, number. Additionally, Ameritrade doesn’t designate any properties as required, whereas Quicktype assumes everything in your example JSON is, which has led to a lot of failed tests.

Next, I’ll likely figure out how to run Quicktype locally via CLI and figure out some sort of build process to use to keep my object code in sync with my schema definitions. There’s been a lot of copypasta going on the past few days, and having it auto update and run tests when the schema changes seems like a good pipeline opportunity. I’ve also got to spend some more time understanding how to tie together complex schema. Ameritrade’s documentation isn’t up to standard, so figuring out to break them up into separate JSON objects and reference them efficiently will be crucial if I’m going to finish converting the endpoints that I need for my project.

That said, Quicktype is a phenomenal tool, and one that I am probably going to use for other projects that interface with REST APIs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.