Git-ing it done

Roll your own GitLab

I had trouble falling asleep last night, Younger crawled in our bed just as I was dozing off and kept squirming as I was falling asleep, so I slept in her bed. It faces East, so I woke up at five and tried to go back to sleep. I heard Elder up, so I got up and started the day. She’s sitting across the room from me, looking up “Valentine’s Day” gifts ideas for the boy in our quarantine bubble down the street. Her sister has been ribbing her about it for days now.

One of our Zombie, LLC clients wants help standing up an internal GitLab server. It got me thinking, so I went ahead and set up a GitLab docker instance on my downstairs Ubuntu server. I figure it’s good practice. Do the job you want has always been good practice, so setting it up was worth the time. Plus it only took about fifteen minutes. The main problem I ran into was an SSH conflict with the existing service on the host. And it doesn’t appear that modifying the config on an existing container requires stopping the Docker daemon, so I just deleted the container and started over. I’ll probably move SSH if I ever do a real deployment, but here at the house the HTTP functionality is enough.

There’s also the mail issue. I didn’t want to use the root account to setup my repos, but the workflow around new accounts wants to send an activation email. I tried installing sendmail on the host, but the password reset didn’t work. I doubt it will work without a publicly routable dynamic DNS entry back to it or SMTP services, which I don’t want to mess with right now. Thankfully I found a password change form in the admin interface that didn’t require knowing the old password and got up and running.

I am nowhere near as strong with my Linux management skills as I am with Windows, where everything is pre-packaged and is somewhat unified. I can stand up domain.local services lickety split, and have a library of PowerShell scripts to setup AD, DNS, DHCP services within a domain. I have never actually taken the time to set one up at home though, but that point may soon be approaching. I’ve been wanting to investigate the use of Ubuntu server as an alternative or supplement to Windows based AD services, but part of me is skeptical that such a setup is even viable for workstation authentication and services. But I digress. The point I’m trying to make here is that I’ve always been in awe of Unix sysadmins ever since I worked at an internet service provider back in the late 90’s and watched our systems guy pop in and out of terminal shells like a wizard. I’ve never felt adequate in that regard.

I made some good progress yesterday working on the WordPress project, and have started converting the client’s site over to the new theme. I’m going over the demo site, examining the Bakery build they’ve got set up, and recreating it using the client’s assets. This allows me to get a bit more familiar with the framework that the theme author is using, and hopefully gleam some best practices at the same time. It’s a two step forward, one step back process. There are some strange bugs that popped up. Activating Woocommerce seems to bring the site down completely, as does changing the theme back to the original. Then at one point, while I was working on the new header, the previews stopped working completely and would only throw 404 errors. They work in the actual site, so I had to make do while I made edits.

Usual best practices for WordPress development and git repos are to exclude the entire WordPress directory except for whatever theme and custom plugin that you’re developing, but since in this case we’re working on an entire site, I’ve added the entire WordPress directory and associated SQL database files. The wp-content/uploads directory is mounted outside the container, along with plugins and themes. I haven’t yet pulled this directory on another machine yet, so I don’t know if it’s going to work. My main concern is how I’m grabbing the database. Managing PostgreSQL during my Django projects has always been a bit of a pain as I never learned how to incorporate it into my source control. I’ll have to spend some time correcting this deficiency.

Here is a look at the Docker Compose file I am using for my development setup. The SQL mount /docker-entrypoint-initdb.d/backup_to_load.sql get’s imported when the container is created; I assume that it’s ignored when pulling the SQL data from source. We shall soon find out. Also, I haven’t solved the file permissions issues that happen when trying to edit things like the wp-config.php file. I’ll have to save that for a later time.

version: '3.8'
services:

  wordpress:
    container_name: 'local-wordpress'
    depends_on:
      - db
    image: 'wordpress:latest'
    ports:
      - '80:80'
    environment:
      WORDPRESS_DB_HOST: db
      WORDPRESS_DB_USER: wordpress_user
      WORDPRESS_DB_PASSWORD: wordpress_password
      WORDPRESS_DB_NAME: wordpress_db
    volumes:
      - "./Wordpress:/var/www/html"
      - "./plugins:/var/www/html/wp-content/plugins"
      - "./themes:/var/www/html/wp-content/themes"
      - "./uploads:/var/www/html/wp-content/uploads"

  db:
    container_name: 'local-wordpress-db'
    image: 'mysql:5.7'
    command: --default-authentication-plugin=mysql_native_password
    volumes:
      - './data/mysql:/var/lib/mysql'
      - './data/localhost.sql:/docker-entrypoint-initdb.d/backup_to_load.sql'
    environment:
      MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: somewordpress
      MYSQL_DATABASE: wordpress_db
      MYSQL_USER: wordpress_user
      MYSQL_PASSWORD: wordpress_password

  adminer:
    image: adminer
    restart: always
    ports:
      - 8080:8080

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.